Building components manufacturer KaterraCombining the CBI Magnum Force Flail 604 and the CBI Magnum Force 754 Disc Chipper, the 7544 Flail Debarker/ Disc Chipper combo (above) offers a standalone solution for businesses that need maximum debarking and high-quality chip production all in one unit.

Manufacturing
CLT state-side

Building components manufacturer Katerra has opened a $150 million, high-volume cross-laminated timber (CLT) factory in Washington State—and feedstock, in the form of dimensional lumber, is all coming from Canada.

By Diane Mettler

It seems like every time you turn around, another wood products mill has closed. That’s exactly why it’s so exciting to see a facility open—and a very large one at that.

Building components manufacturer KaterraIn September, building components manufacturer Katerra opened North America’s highest volume cross-laminated timber (CLT) factory in Spokane Valley, Washington. The 270,000-square-foot facility is strategically located on a 52-acre site, with easy access to rail lines and interstate highways.

At full operation, the factory will employ 105 people with an annual manufacturing capacity of 185,000 cubic metres, the equivalent of 13 million square feet of 5-ply panels, and can produce up to 140 boards per minute. To put this in perspective, it will be able to produce enough material for fifty 250,000 square-foot commercial office buildings per year.

The plant was constructed by primarily local talent—the general contractor was Lydig Construction of Spokane, Washington; McKinstry Company of Spokane handled the mechanicals and HVAC; Evergreen Engineering of Eugene, Oregon was responsible for engineering; ARC Electric and Lighting of Spokane installed the electrical; and Casey Industrial of Westminster, Colorado took on the industrial equipment installation.

Katerra’s state-of-the-art CLT facility reflects the company’s technology-first approach, incorporating advanced geometric and biometric scanning of lamstock, an on-site kiln for precise moisture control and artificial intelligence to further improve safety and reduce waste. The result is a consistent, high-quality product.

Katerra’s factory also features the largest CLT press currently in operation globally, offering customers what it says is unmatched design flexibility.

Building components manufacturer Katerra“The press is 12-foot wide, so we can press a 12-foot by 60-foot long panel. We do three-ply, five-ply, seven-ply and nine-ply,” says Plant General Manager, Jason Herman, who was involved with the first CLT plant in the U.S., SmartLam in Columbia Falls, Montana, and also assisted Vaagen Timbers on building their CLT mill in Colville, Washington.

Hermann adds that the company is currently commissioning a sorting line as well as a chipper system, and things are going well.

“I think the industry is going to do very well,” says Herman. “The Europeans have been manufacturing CLT for 30-plus years. The United States started doing mass timber in about 2012, and demand is continually increasing.”

One of the things that makes Katerra unique is that it offers end-to-end new build services. It provides design, manufacturing, and construction services to deliver a building project from beginning to end. For CLT, Katerra offers a range of services from material supply to related hardware and materials and install to end-to-end building services.

Although the Katerra plant is still in its start-up phase, it has already finished producing product for its first project, where it is also the general contractor —the Catalyst Building in Spokane—a dramatic five-story, 150,000-square-foot building that will feature two wings around a light-filled atrium. It will be the first office building in Washington constructed out of CLT, and is expected to open in 2020. And, the company is well into its third and fourth projects.

Building components manufacturer KaterraAt full operation, the Katerra factory will have annual manufacturing capacity of 185,000 cubic metres, the equivalent of 13 million square feet of 5-ply panels, and can produce up to 140 boards per minute. To put this in perspective, it will be able to produce enough material for fifty 250,000 square-foot commercial office buildings per year.

As mentioned, Katerra selected the Spokane Valley to build their factory in part for the ease of accessibility for product delivery. But the area is also perfect for its access to raw material resources.

Raw material in the form of dimensional lumber is currently coming from Canada, but the company is looking at expanding its raw material supply from within the U.S.

“What we have to do is get certified for different species in the U.S.,” says Herman. “We’re currently working on that and then we will use some fir and larch in the future. Until that time, we are using small diameter two-by-six spruce, pine and fir from Canada.”

Katerra sources 100 per cent of their lamstock from well-managed forests, a basic Katerra requirement. All lamstock sourced from Canada is SFI or PEFC certified at a minimum, and it can source FSC-certified wood as desired by its customers.

“We now have a pipeline,” Herman says. “We’re good through about 2020.”

The facility’s equipment was globally sourced and selected based on a production model. The company determined what it wanted to produce on a daily basis, and based on that, purchased equipment offering production timing that would meet their goals.The system is fully automated. Herman says if the wood is good and dry, it can pass through the CLT process in two-and-a-half hours.

Building components manufacturer KaterraThe Katerra plant’s equipment was globally sourced and selected based on a production model. The company determined what it wanted to produce on a daily basis, and based on that, purchased equipment offering production timing that would meet their goals.

The process is fairly straightforward. The raw material first passes through a sorting line purchased from USNR in Woodland, Washington. The moisture sensors supplied by Finna Group from Denver, Colorado, determine which material is dry enough for processing. If the wood is dry enough, it is sent through the CLT production line. If not, it goes into a USNR kiln.

The CLT line has three planers, all manufactured by Gilbert in Roberval, Quebec.

“The wood goes through the first set of planers and gets to near-net-size there,” explains Herman. “Then, on planers two and three, it gets to net-size. Once it travels through the finger jointer, the product makes a continuous ribbon of lumber up to 60 feet, so we can do our layups in our press.”

From the CLT press, the product then travels to one of three CNC machines. Two of the CNC machines were purchased from Uniteam (Biesse), of Thiene, Italy. The third came from Germany’s Hundegger AG.

Herman says after the CNC work is complete, the material travels on to the sander, which they sourced from Costa in Archdale, North Carolina “From the sander, it continues on to the crane we purchased from Galifco Oregon, out of Eugene. The crane offloads the finished CLT panels and prepares it for Quality Assurance/Quality Control certification. “Once the panel is certified, we load it on the truck, and send it to the job site,” explains Herman.

Building components manufacturer KaterraKaterra CLT is tested for its intended use in compliance with the 2018 International Building Code (IBC) and all relevant reference standards including ANSI/APA PRG 320 (2018) for ready use in the U.S.

The company intends to pursue third-party voluntary environmental certification of Katerra CLT to authenticate transparency in its materials and manufacturing process, as well as quantify the embodied environmental impacts of Katerra CLT. This process will begin once the factory has been in operation for at least 12 months.

The environmental label certification Katerra will apply for is a product- and process-specific Type III Environmental Product Declaration to ISO 14025 Environmental labels and declarations; Type III Environmental Declarations Principles and Procedures (EPD.)

After so many months of researching, designing, purchasing, contracting and organizing all the details, Herman says it has been exciting to watch the plant break ground, followed by equipment installation and then, finally, the commissioning in May.

“During the commissioning time, we had some training,” he says. “There were five of us who went to Europe for about 10 days, and we did some training with some other CLT plants. It was really amazing to see other manufacturers produce their CLT.”

When the company is fully staffed, it will employ a wide variety of people from different industries.

“Our hiring interview process is very effective, and we interview as a management group,” says Herman. “We’ve had very minimal turnover. That is because we treat our people like assets, as they are the assets. We run a sturdy ship here.”

Herman is excited about the future of the CLT industry, and is thankful for having a great team.

Herman is not the only one excited about the new CLT plant. U.S. Senator Maria Cantwell, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, and Commissioner of Public Lands Hilary Franz were all in attendance at the grand opening of the facility, and enthusiastic about what it meant to the state and the industry.

“We are so excited to see Katerra’s investment and innovation come to our state, which could not have happened at a better time,” Franz said. “Mass timber complements the Department of Natural Resources’ forest health work in central and eastern Washington, which will produce byproducts like small diameter trees that can be used to make CLT and create jobs in rural, timber-dependent communities.”

“We have a young generation that is demanding to be saved from climate change and a somewhat older generation who is using their technological prowess, their entrepreneurial zeal and the incredible skillset that we have in working people in Washington State to give them not only solutions to climate change, but jobs for the future,” said Inslee. Inslee was running as a presidential candidate for the Democratic Party, on a platform heavily focused on dealing with climate change. He pulled out of the race in August.

Cantwell added: “Cross-laminated timber is a triple-win that can deliver low-carbon building materials, promote forest health, and create new timber community jobs.”

Logging and Sawmilling Journal

On the Cover:
Building components manufacturer Katerra recently opened North America’s highest volume cross-laminated timber (CLT) factory in Spokane Valley, Washington, and Logging and Sawmilling Journal has all the details on the new production facility beginning on page 28. The new plant has an annual manufacturing capacity of 185,000 cubic metres, the equivalent of 13 million square feet of 5-ply panels (Cover photo courtesy of Katerra Inc.).

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The BC Forest Safety Council is a leader in forest safety, and its employees such as Mike Pottinger are great advocates for industry safety, from the bush to the repair shop.

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More chips, please!
B.C.’s Valiant Log Sort has seen big-time growth in its wood chipping operations, with the closure/curtailment of a number of sawmills, and it has added to its equipment line-up with a new CBI 7544 Flail Debarker and Disc Chipper.

Manufacturing CLT state-side—with Canadian lumber
Building components manufacturer Katerra has opened a $150 million, high-volume cross-laminated timber (CLT) factory in Washington State—and feedstock, in the form of dimensional lumber, is all coming from Canada.

Breaking down wood—without breaking the bank
B.C. custom sawmiller Bob Jerke has discovered how to break down timbers into high volumes of boards without breaking the bank, thanks to a lower cost, manually-operated band sawmill.

Tech Update
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The Edge
Included in this edition of The Edge, Canada’s leading publication on research in the forest industry, are stories from Alberta Innovates and Canadian Wood Fibre Centre (CWFC).

The Last Word
The present may look gloomy for the B.C. Interior forest industry, but it is tackling adversity and planning for the future, explains columnist Jim Stirling.

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