Logging and Sawmilling Journal November 2013

November 2013

On the Cover:
A Komatsu WA450 front end loader takes a load of logs from Schiller Contracting at the Revelstoke Community Forest Corporation sort yard in Revelstoke, B.C. Watch for a story on Schiller Contracting and the work the company is doing in steep slope logging in southeastern B.C. in a future issue of Logging and Sawmilling Journal (Photo by Paul MacDonald).

Life after the beetle
The journey has begun on what the future of the B.C. Cariboo—home to some of the most forest industry-dependent communities in the entire province—could look like in the post-mountain pine beetle era.

Loggers—and wildlife protectors
B.C. logging contractor Ivan Larson—who is past president of the B.C. Wildlife Federation—has a special passion for maintaining wildlife habitat as part of the company’s logging operations. Their motto: “creating wildlife habitat since 1929”.

Moving forward with changes in the woods
Langille Bros. Contracting have had to roll with a series of big time changes in the Nova Scotia forest industry, but they’ve responded to the changes with advanced equipment, including the first John Deere 1910E forwarder in the province.

Equipment trail-blazers
Quebec’s Élément Group is doing some trailblazing, manufacturing a line of feller bunchers in the province—branded under the Eltec name—with a plant in Val-d’Or, and a research and development team in Quebec City.

The Edge
Included in The Edge, Canada’s leading publication on research in the forest industry, are stories from the Canadian Wood Fibre Centre, Alberta Innovates - Bio Solutions, FPInnovations and the Alberta Distance Learning Centre.

B.C. sawmill closures

It’s all in the details for Nova Scotia sawmill
The Groupe Savoie operation in Nova Scotia focuses closely on details in the woods and in the mill, working with its log suppliers to ensure it receives high quality hardwood timber, and ensuring it gets maximum lumber quality and value in the mill.

Re-start for White River
The re-start of the White River sawmill—through a company headed up by Tembec veteran Frank Dottori—is helping to bring the economy of this small northern Ontario town back to life.

The Last Word
Jim Stirling says that when it comes to logging disruptions by First Nations groups, perhaps it’s time to start sending the bill to band councils.

Supplier Newsline