Logging and Sawmilling Journal October/November 2010

April 2011

On the Cover:

After a dismal five years of declining lumber markets, forest companies and sawmills are starting to crank up production, primarily to meet growing demands for lumber in the Chinese market. Logging and Sawmilling takes a look—with the help of Canada’s largest wood products consulting firm, International WOOD MARKETS Group Inc.—at lumber production numbers in this issue, with the authoritative list of Canada’s Top 10 Lumber Producers.

(Photo of the Vanderwell Contractors (1971) Ltd sawmill in Slave Lake,
Alberta by Tony Kryzanowski)

Spotlight

The forest industry in Canada’s largest wood basket—the B.C. Central Interior—is working its way out of the doldrums, and there are now regular mill re-openings. But the result has been a labour shortage in the bush and at the sawmill.

The right equipment ingredients

Logging contractor—and ex-hockey player—Wade Fournier brings all the right ingredients to the table, starting with a modern equipment fleet and unique skills, particularly experience operating tilter feller bunchers and knowing how to safely harvest timber on steeper ground.

A harvesting equipment dream

Armand Landry’s dream of producing a purpose-built tracked harvester has come true with the development and production of the Landrich harvester—and four of these very efficient and productive harvesters are now at work in New Brunswick and Quebec.

Drying Lumber with Solar Power

In British Columbia, a pilot project using a solar hybrid kiln to dry lumber has delivered good results—and offers the potential of savings for a forest industry that is always looking to cut its energy costs.

Canada’s Top Lumber Producers –
West Fraser on top

Logging and Sawmilling Journal’s authoritative ranking of Canada’s largest lumber producers—who’s up and who’s down in lumber production.

Canadian companies exploring the Indian wood market

Tech Update – Skidders

Logging and Sawmilling Journal has the latest information on what’s new with skidders in this issue’s Tech Update.

Supplier Newsline

The Last Word

It’s time to jump-start the B.C. Forest Service—not bury it, says Jim Stirling.