Logging and Sawmilling Journal October/November 2010December/January 2011

On the Cover:

A Cat 325 butt ‘n top unit unloads timber for the Rivercity Fibre chipping operation in Kamloops, B.C. The Rivercity Fibre operation provides chips for the Domtar pulp mill in Kamloops, and requires a steady flow of timber coming in the yard. On an average day, they are sending 2200 cubic metres of mountain pine beetle-killed timber through the chipper. (Cover photo by Paul MacDonald)

Spotlight

After some very tough years, the Saskatchewan forest industry is starting to come back to life, following a reallocation of the forest resource. But not everyone is happy with the end result.

West Fraser launches huge mill
capital investments

In an exclusive interview with Logging and Sawmilling Journal, West Fraser Timber CEO Hank Ketchum talks about the company’s $230 million mill capital investment program, and the growth in the Chinese lumber market.

Staying ahead of customer needs

The Baker Boys in Alberta know what it takes to survive as a logging operation—and they’ve evolved and adapted with their logging equipment to stay ahead of the curve, and meet customer needs.

Stack ‘em high

Tolko’s Quest Wood Division in Quesnel, B.C. has made an investment in two Liebherr 934 C machines, which is allowing them to stack logs higher—and ended the need for satellite log storage yards.

Bio-energy could energize forest industry

A resilient Manning Diversified Forest Products has toughed out the downturn in lumber markets, but the company believes the real opportunity going forward could be in bio-energy, which would help Alberta’s forest industry to be more competitive.

Small sawmill is thinking large

What started out as a small sawmilling operation in Nova Scotia has since grown, and is now turning out product for the broader Canadian market—with sights set on the U.S., European and Asian markets.

Tech Update—Grapples

Logging and Sawmilling Journal has the latest equipment information on grapples in this issue’s Tech Update.

Supplier Newsline

The Last Word

Tony Kryzanowski says it’s time for Canada to stop waiting for the U.S.— and that is should go its own way on the environment.